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Prince’s Private photographer releases new Novel of Uncommon images

An acquaintance at Paisley Park ordered for Baltimore artist Steve Parke to get an assignment/audition to get Prince.

Parke needed to paint a style on the stage floor to its Lovesexy Tour. Parke had three hours to come up with a concept at Paisley prior to Prince left for France.

Parke got the gig. And he kept about painting — remaining on as art director and Prince’s own photographer for 14 decades.

Parke did everything from designing stage sets and functioning on movie shoots to photographing album designing and covers souvenir T-shirts. And he continued to dwell in Baltimore, spending about one week per month in Chanhassen.

This autumn, Parke, 53, printed “Picturing Prince.” Ostensibly a photograph book (a number of his movies are priceless, like Prince in furry bowling boots), the 240-page project also offers rare insights to Prince as a creative entity and individual being. With nearly every picture, Parke shares an anecdote regarding Prince’s songs, M.O. or character — or even a conversation they’d had.

Parke will probably be from the Twin Cities on Sept. 19 to get a Q&A session using ex-Prince keyboardist Morris Hayes at Barnes & Noble in Edina. First, the gregarious Parke answered a few queries to the Star Tribune.

Steve Parke

Prince’s long-time photographer and art director only printed a book of his romantic candids, portraits and more.

On why he got along with Prince, a notoriously demanding control freak

“I did anything different. I wasn’t a musician. I wasn’t someone who he could declare to: ‘If you can not do this, I could do this,’ ” Parke said. “I’m a big music lover. I pretended to speak to him like a buddy. We spent a lot of time along late nights, he’d share music with me and I would share things.”

In addition, Parke felt Prince enjoyed his honesty.

“I learned not to say no to Prince but that I could tell him exactly what measures it might take [to do an idea] so he could decide if that’s a not or no.”

About the camera loving Prince but Prince not loving the camera

“He needed a love/hate relationship using the camera,” Parke clarified. “He understood what he needed to perform. He never really griped about it. Another thing, we had been shooting digital and helped him unwind. It was efficient. Makeup and Hair took three times more than the shoot. Digital provided less tension. He could make a decision.”

On questioning Prince’s wardrobe options

“No, no,” said Parke. “There were a couple that were suspicious to me” but the art director never prevailed.

“He could pull off appearances no one else can. He just took risks with everything. Using a digital camera, the worst-case scenario is he would delete the files”

On shooting candid photos

“It’s relative to that which candid way to him personally,” Parke said. “He dressed like this.”

As an example, the publication captures Prince obtaining his hair done by a stylist. That wasn’t staged. Or always flattering.

The photos of Prince from the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum are “more informal,” Parke said. “They’re more reflective of him as a person. him because the persona that people came to know. There are a few shoots where he let down his guard.”

On photographing Prince playing basketball

Parke came down to Paisley’s loading dock where Prince was shooting one night about 4 a.m.. The photographer wasn’t always sure if his digital cameras were quickly enough to catch Prince in concert or on the move.

“I bet you can not catch me,” Prince explained to Parke.

What’s Reserve signing and Q&A for his “Picturing Prince.” He was Prince’s art director for 14 decades, ending in 2001.

“The [photograph] where he was static as well as the ball was shifting between his legs was ideal,” Parke said. “Then he belongs: ‘You got it’ ”

After Prince died last year, Parke submitted some stories and photos on Facebook. People responded it helped them deal with Prince’s departure. He encouraged him to collect a book.

In addition, Parke stated, Prince had earlier been putting some of Parke’s unpublished images on Instagram.

“I felt good about it,” Parke said.

On why he, not Prince’s real estate, possesses the photographs

“He never wrote up anything between us,” he explained. Thus, the photographer owns the photographs.

But Parke reported that since all the photographs were taken with digital cameras, Prince saw the pictures immediately and deleted whatever he didn’t like.

One of the most misunderstood thing about Prince

His work ethic, Parke stated.

“One time he stated : ‘People say I play audio. I’m functioning.’

“I don’t think people can envision how hard he’d worked. When he was doing rehearsals, he was 120 percent acting.”

One afternoon in the middle of a photo shoot, Prince requested Parke: “Why is it that people think that I had a nose job?”

Parke clarified in his early photos, Prince’s eyes were largely flat with the camera lens. More recent pictures were shot using a lower angle. So Prince requested Parke to shoot some photographs like the previous ones. And sure enough, Parke reportsthat the Purple One’s nose looked like his ” old nose”

After Parke’s kid was born, he was no longer willing to be on telephone. When he declined to meet a last-minute change in Prince’s schedule, the impetuous manager took him off salary and place him on retainer.

One day Prince explained to Parke: “You have to miss your child.” Indeed. That’s why he ceased and today works with different customers, including HBO, DC/Vertigo Comics along with Sheila E.

Said Parke: “If you’re working for Prince, you’re all”

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Czech-Born Architect And Photographer Jan Vranovsky Captures Fascinating Minimalist Images Of Japanese Urban Spaces

Czech-Born Architect And Photographer Jan Vranovsky Captures Fascinating Minimalist Images Of Western Urban Spaces

Jan Vranovsky is a Czech-born architect, designer and photographer currently living in Tokyo. His series Parallel World is a visual listing of modern Japanese urban spaces. Interested in how architecture defines the surface of the city, his photos focus on miniature backstreets and alleys, instead of structure with conceptual and aesthetic ambitions.

























































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Get Best View In Hong Kong Rooftop Bars

Foot traffic in Hong Kong can test the patience of even the most seasoned of traveler and at some points, the city can resemble an overturned anthill. This is a city where everybody is hustling, everyone is trying to make that next buck and capitalism and entrepreneurship are definitely on steroids.

Sometimes when the weekend comes around or that weekday has simply been to filled with frenetic street-level activity it may be time to escape ground level and head for the sky in order to relax at one of the fantastic rooftop bars that can be found in Hong Kong.

So which of the many rooftop bars are an absolute must for those who want exceptional service, great cocktails and some of the most magnificent views of the entire region?

Firstly, a trip to the secret oasis of Vibes is an antidote for Hong Kong’s high energy pulse. Set up for the Mira hotel, go up to the fifth floor and find a place where the beautiful people of Hong Kong go to relax. This is a place to go if you want your cocktails fresh and inventive.

Escape the concrete jungle by paying a visit to hotel Ovolo Southside. Here you will find ‘Above’. Views over a lush green landscape will have you wondering if the concrete mayhem of Hong Kong is all just a dream.

If you want to simply stay at a single venue during a night then head for ‘ON’ in Central. https://www.therooftopguide.com/rooftop-bars-in-hong-kong.html recommend that A great Alfresco bar and two stories with a restaurant serving Mediterranean cuisine combined with exceptional views of the city and some of the best cocktails on offer in Hong Kong. The champagne and wine list are well worth browsing and taking an extra bit of time to find that perfect tipple.

Get up high and see Hong Kong in a whole new light from one of the exceptional rooftop bars in the city.

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5 Reasons Why Wedding Photographers Must Know Street Photography

I recently shot a buddy’s wedding, also discovered that my street photography techniqies have tremendously benefited me.


See forthcoming ERIC KIM STREET PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOPS >


Thank you Neil

Cindy and Eric wedding picture by Neil Ta
Cindy and Eric wedding picture from Neil Ta

Some of the best wedding photographers that I understand just like NEIL TA are both excellent wedding photographers and street photographers.

When Neil shot my wedding Cindy, he incorporated legendary angles, and captured heaps of amazing “critical moments”, and also incorporated his signature urban landscape compositions.

I think that all street photographers can benefit by shooting a wedding, and all wedding photographers can benefit learning how to shoot photography.

A few of Neil’s best wedding photos below:

Some of the Finest decisive moments from Neil:

Thanks again Neil.

Picture with Kelly, Myself, Cindy, and Neil

Take a Look at

Below are some street photography Methods that wedding photographers may integrate into their job, to Be Able to make more lively wedding photos:

Layers

When I shoot street photography, one method I like to integrate is layers. Many wedding photographers can benefit by also shooting layers, to catch more of a story in a spectacle.

As an example, when I shot my wedding, I shot lots of my pictures of Cindy with street photography methods, such as shooting flash.

Also note the layers I incorporated into my picture of Cindy flexing in the mirror, along with her mom in the bottom left corner.

Having more feelings and faces in the landscape makes for a more engaging, more lively, and enjoyable picture.

2. Dynamic Compositions

A good deal of street photographers possess lively compositions, such as the “Dutch angle” method of tilting your camera.

One other picture I shot of my buddies Mark and Isi onto a bridge — tilting my camera, which unifies the horizon (normally seen as a “no” in pictures)– but makes the scene more lively:

3. Aggressiveness

Street photography technique of depth: focusing on the parents in the background, with the guests in the foreground. Feels very much like a street photograph.
Street photography method of depth: focusing to the parents in the background, with the guests in the foreground. Feels like a street photograph.

Street photographers prefer to fill the frame, also get close, also AGGRESSIVE to have the shot.

Street photographers aren’t shy. Consider, if you wish to be a fantastic wedding photographer, then you have to understand to overcome social stress, also to be bold interacting with guests, both popping (quite close) or asking for permission.

For myself, I discovered the assertiveness I heard from street photography advantage me when I shot my buddy’s wedding. I managed to yell and get people to hear me either when gathering and shooting group photos, or if it came to not being shy about being closer to the activity.

4. Capturing “the decisive moment”

In street photography, the concept of “the critical instant” is crucial.

Basically, street photographers have very fine tails, and are extremely fast — such as gunslingers via an old school western.

Once I shot my buddies blossom, I was in the zone– just like when I shoot street photography. The abilities of me being able to shoot and react quickly during the wedding all spanned over from street photography.

The moments you wish to catch in a wedding are critical, and only occur once. What could you do as a wedding photographer in case you missed the critical kiss, involving the wedding couple?

5. Cross-pollination

Photographing my wedding educated me as a street photographer: I shouldn’t just restrict myself in street photography — I need to explore and shoot all genres of pictures. Why? Because my street photography methods and abilities carried more, also “cross legged” nicely in wedding pictures, and all forms of photography (much landscape and architecture photography).

Conclusion

To sum up,

Wedding photographers could learn much from street photographers, and street photographers can learn far from wedding photographers.

Have fun,
ERIC